Quick Answer: Will My Face Go Back To Normal After Bell’S Palsy?

Can you fully recover from Bell’s palsy?

Bell’s palsy is not considered permanent, but in rare cases, it does not disappear.

Currently, there is no known cure for Bell’s palsy; however, recovery usually begins 2 weeks to 6 months from the onset of the symptoms.

Most people with Bell’s palsy recover full facial strength and expression..

How do you treat facial paralysis naturally?

Home treatment may include:Protecting the eye you can’t close. Using lubricating eyedrops during the day and an eye ointment at night will help keep your eye moist. … Taking over-the-counter pain relievers. … Doing your physical therapy exercises.

Is facial massage good for Bell’s palsy?

Massage is recommended to stretch and mobilize facial muscles until the nerve has repaired itself. It is important to promote circulation which will encourage nerve repair. Deep tissue techniques to the muscles of the jaw, suboccipitals, and facial connective tissues are highly recommended.

How likely is Bell’s palsy to return?

Bell palsy recurs in 4-14% of patients, with one source suggesting a recurrence rate of 7%. It may recur on the same or opposite side of the initial palsy. Recurrence usually is associated with a family history of recurrent Bell palsy.

Does stress cause Bell’s palsy?

Medical experts believe that stress weakens the immune system and damages the seventh cranial nerve (or the facial nerve) which causes facial paralysis. The condition causes one side of your face to droop or become stiff. A Bell’s Palsy patient will face trouble in smiling or closing the eye on the affected side.

Is Bell’s palsy a sign of a stroke?

Bell’s palsy is a temporary paralysis of the facial muscles, causing drooping and weakness on one side of the face, and is sometimes mistaken for a stroke. While alarming, Bell’s palsy is usually not permanent and resolves itself in two weeks to six months, depending on the severity.

What are signs of recovery from Bell’s palsy?

However, the recovery time varies between individuals and will depend on the amount of nerve damage. Most people notice an improvement in their symptoms after about two to three weeks but a complete recovery can take between three and six months. Some patients are left with some degree of permanent facial weakness.

Does facial paralysis go away?

Unfortunately, even with all current options for therapy, some cases of facial paralysis may never completely go away. For these people, physical therapy and eye care can help prevent any further damage and improve quality of life.

What is the fastest way to recover from Bell’s palsy?

Seven steps towards recovery from acute Bell’s PalsyDon’t panic. See the doctor at once and follow his recommendations. … Take a lot of rest and sleep as much as you can. Do not go to work for at least several days. … Protect your affected eye from drying. Use special eye drops (artificial tears) or ointment. … Make 9 pictures of the so called “neurological test”.More items…•

What causes face paralysis?

An inability to move the muscles of the face on one or both sides is known as facial paralysis. Facial paralysis can result from nerve damage due to congenital (present at birth) conditions, trauma or disease, such as stroke, brain tumor or Bell’s palsy.

How do you treat facial paralysis?

In many cases of facial nerve weakness, providers may prescribe an oral steroid that will help to reduce inflammation (irritation) of the facial nerve. Multiple research studies have shown that high doses of medication, started within 72 hours of the paresis (weakness) or paralysis, will improve chances for recovery.

Does heat help Bell’s palsy?

Treating Bell’s Palsy at Home Using moist heat like MediBeads or even a warm washcloth several times a day can relieve pain and improve circulation. You can also prevent muscle waste, ease pain and maintain your facial tone by using electrical stimulation at home with a TENS unit.

What are the long term effects of Bell’s palsy?

Approximately 30% of patients, however, experience long-term symptoms following the paralysis, and approximately 5% are left with an unacceptably high degree of sequelae. Bell palsy sequelae include incomplete motor regeneration, incomplete sensory regeneration, and aberrant reinnervation of the facial nerve.