Quick Answer: What Are Long Term Effects Of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning?

How long does the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning last?

An unusual feature of acute CO poisoning is the delayed deterioration in neurological condition which may be seen in some cases, occurring anything from a few days to as long as five to six weeks after the initial exposure.

The reason for this is not entirely clear, but changes in the white matter seem to be involved..

Can you recover from severe carbon monoxide poisoning?

Delayed neurological sequelae develop between 2 and 240 days after exposure, and are reported to affect 10-32% of people recovering from carbon monoxide poisoning. Symptoms include cognitive changes, personality changes, incontinence, psychosis, and Parkinsonism. Fortunately, 50-75% of people recover within 1 year.

Can carbon monoxide build up in your body over time?

Carbon monoxide poisoning can occur suddenly or over a long period of time. Breathing low levels of carbon monoxide over a long period can cause severe heart problems and brain damage. See a doctor if: You often are short of breath and have mild nausea and headaches when you are indoors.

What is the first sign of carbon monoxide poisoning?

The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, upset stomach, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion. CO symptoms are often described as “flu-like.” If you breathe in a lot of CO it can make you pass out or kill you.

What are the after effects of carbon monoxide poisoning?

Survivors of severe, acute CO poisoning can develop long-term neurologic sequelae (e.g., impairments in memory, concentration, and speech, as well as depression and parkinsonism). These sequelae may arise immediately after CO poisoning or may be delayed (occurring 2–21 days after CO poisoning).

Can carbon monoxide poisoning have long term effects?

Prolonged significant exposure to carbon monoxide can cause serious complications, including brain damage and heart problems. In very severe cases, it can result in death. Effects of severe carbon monoxide poisoning include: breathlessness.