Question: How Do You Use Who And Whom In A Sentence?

Who vs whom examples sentences?

The Best Way to RememberUse “who” when the subject of the sentence would normally require a subject pronoun like “he” or “she.” …

Use “whom” when a sentence needs an object pronoun like “him” or “her.” For example, “This is for whom?” Again, if you rewrote that question as a statement, “this is for him” sounds correct..

How do you use many of whom?

“When do you write “many of which” and when “many of whom”?” “Many of which” applies to inanimate objects. “Many of whom” applies to animate objects — more specifically, people.

What is the meaning of whom in English?

Whom is the object form of who. We use whom to refer to people in formal styles or in writing, when the person is the object of the verb.

Is all of whom correct?

“All of whom” is more idiomatically correct. Of is a preposition, so the object form “whom” is preferable. That being said, colloquially “who” often replaces “whom” in everyday speech, and though a grammarian may not approve of that usage, some Americans probably wouldn’t blink twice if they heard “all of who.”

Can you use whom for plural?

Answer and Explanation: The word “whom” is a pronoun that can replace a singular or plural noun. “Whom” is only used as the object of a sentence or as a…

Has or have after a person name?

The easiest way to remember the correct use of has is that it is paired with the pronouns he, she, and it. It can also be used when you are referring to someone by name. It is important to note that has is only used with the third person singular pronouns. The third person plural they is used with have.

Is it many of who or many of whom?

A: It should be “whom.” The clause at the end of that sentence should read “ … many of whom are held back by societal barriers.” As you know, a clause has its own subject and verb. In this clause, the subject is “many,” and the verb is “are.”

Can we use have with who?

Have is the root VERB and is generally used alongside the PRONOUNS I / You / We / Ye and They and PLURAL NOUNS. … Has is used alongside the PRONOUNS He / She / It and Who and SINGULAR NOUNS. However, there are some exceptions which will be explained later on in the lesson. In general, has is a PRESENT TENSE word.

Who is she or who is her?

Re: who is she or who is her ?? When you use a linking verb, such as “be”, you should always use the subject pronoun. Who is she? Where are they? It is he.

When answering phone this is she or this is her?

“This is she” is grammatically correct. The verb “to be” acts as a linking verb, equating subject and object. So this is she and she is this; “she” and “this” are one and the same, interchangeable, and to be truly interchangeable they must both play the same grammatical role—that of the subject.

What is the word she?

the woman, girl, or female animal (or, sometimes, the thing regarded as female) previously mentioned: feminine personal pronoun in the third person singular: she is the nominative form, her the objective, hers the possessive, and herself the reflexive and intensive; her is the possessive pronominal adjective.

Who or whom I love so much?

who/whom is the direct object of the verb love: “You love who/whom.” The rules for formal written English say that the word should be whom, because it is in the objective case. … “Whom do you love?” would sound a little stilted to many English speakers.

What are examples of questions?

WH-questions are questions starting with WH-words including: what, when, where, who, whom, which, whose, why and how….II. Responding to WH-questionsWhat. What is it? … When. When will the train arrive? … Where. Where do you live? … Who. Who’s this? … Whom. Whom should we talk to? … Which. … Whose. … Why.More items…

How do you use whom in a sentence examples?

Examples of “whom” in a sentence:He saw the faces of those whom he loved at his birthday celebration.She saw a lady whom she presumed worked at the store, and she asked her a question.Here dwells an old woman with whom I would like to converse.More items…•

Do you say this is she or this is her when answering the phone?

The grammatically consistent correct answer is “this is she” because she is the subject (in the nominative case).

Who had or who has?

“Have” and “has” are present tense verbs. “Had” is the past tense of these two verbs. In the present tense, “have” is used for I, you, we, and they and all plural nouns. “Has” is used for he, she, and it, and for all singular nouns.

Who vs whom in a question?

If the preposition is at the end of the question, informal English uses “who” instead of “whom.” (As seen in “Who will I speak with” above.) … However, if the question begins with a preposition, you will need to use “whom,” whether the sentence is formal or informal.

Who or whom should I contact?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom.

Which is correct sentence?

In order for a sentence to be grammatically correct, the subject and verb must both be singular or plural. In other words, the subject and verb must agree with one another in their tense. If the subject is in plural form, the verb should also be in plur al form (and vice versa).

Is it who or whom am I speaking to?

In formal English, “to whom am I speaking” would be correct. “Whom” is the objective form of “who,” and “whom” is the object of the preposition “to” in the sentence “to whom am I speaking?”. However, here in the USA at least, we usually refrain from using the most formal kind of English in ordinary conversation.

Who has been or have been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. The present perfect tense refers to an action that began at some time in the past and is still in progress.